“You  really stuck it to me today”: The Political Cartoons of Dwane Powell

“You really stuck it to me today”: The Political Cartoons of Dwane Powell

RALEIGH, N.C. (May 25, 2017)The City of Raleigh Museum announced today that its retrospective of the nationally syndicated work of political cartoonist and area resident Dwane Powell will open to the public Sunday, June 4. Titled “You really stuck it to me today”: The Political Cartoons of Dwane Powell,” the free exhibit will feature more than 40 cartoons from Powell’s childhood to the present, as well as sketchbooks and artifacts of the cartoonist’s trade. “You really stuck it to me today” will be on display through 2019.

Powell has inked over 15,000 cartoons during his four decade-long career that have caricatured presidents, politicians, and North Carolina notables. Powell began cartooning for The News & Observer newspaper in 1975, where he remained until his official retirement in 2009. He continues to ink images for the newspaper’s Sunday edition. His provocative drawings about topics such as gun control and HB2 never fail to tickle funny bones or raise hackles, and are always successful in inspiring audiences to engage in current events conversations.

Powell’s work is an encapsulation of social history of the past forty plus years. It reflects his views on complicated issues molded into satirical and comical images that poke fun at both Republicans and Democrats alike. The museum exhibit’s title appropriately stems from a quote made by North Carolina’s iconic senator, Jesse Helms, who after viewing a cartoon, called up Powell and exclaimed, “You really stuck it to me today” – but still asked to display the artwork.

Growing up on a farm in rural Arkansas, Powell studied agri-business at the University of Arkansas-Monticello but loved doodling and was drawn to the cartoons he saw in Collier’s, The Saturday Evening Post and MAD Magazine. It was only by luck that his hometown paper offered him $5 a cartoon, launching his life-long passion. Powell went on to win industry recognition including the Overseas Press Club Award for Excellence in Cartooning and the National Headliners Club Award for Outstanding Editorial Cartoons. He has published three collections of his cartoons.

“Dwane Powell is a legend among American editorial cartoonists with his innate ability to chronicle the life and times of our country in a single frame,” said Ernest Dollar, director of the City of Raleigh Museum. “It is truly an honor for the museum to highlight the amazing work of one of Raleigh’s own.”

The People’s Politics: Local Democracy in Raleigh

The People’s Politics: Local Democracy in Raleigh

How does local government affect you? Does your opinion matter? Can you make a difference? The City of Raleigh Museum will explore these questions in a new exhibit. The People’s Politics: Local Democracy in Raleigh tells the story of city government and democracy at a local level, from the election of Raleigh’s first Mayor in 1795 to issues facing current and future mayors. Using research from city council minutes and artifacts from the museum’s collection, this interactive exhibit highlights the citizen role in law-making, giving visitors the opportunity to examine significant decisions from Raleigh’s past, and cast their vote on current challenges facing citizens and leaders of our growing city.

R3: Raleigh Then, Raleigh Now, Raleigh Next.

R3: Raleigh Then, Raleigh Now, Raleigh Next.

Explore Raleigh’s history through 200 years of artifacts and images. The R3 timeline offers a glimpse into the city’s rich cultural landscape. Interactive kiosks provide visitors with a fun and challenging way to explore photographs from Raleigh’s past. The COR Museum’s mascot, Sir Sammy the Squirrel, has included an interactive in the exhibit that teaches children how trees in the City of Oaks can reveal secrets about the past.

Our War: Voices of Raleigh’s World War II Veterans.

Our War: Voices of Raleigh’s World War II Veterans.

The “Our War…” exhibit will tell the tale of two different Raleighs and how its residents who went to war had vastly different experiences in the same conflict. Though 70 years have passed, many personal events of the war are fresh in the minds of the veterans. By sharing their stories, these veterans give us a revealing look at what it was like to grow up in 30’s/40’s Raleigh and leave for war. By collecting their stories in their own words it is hoped the exhibit will be a testament to the varied contributions of Raleigh’s diverse residents.

Raleigh’s City Flag: Lost and Found

Raleigh’s City Flag: Lost and Found

Did you know Raleigh is one of 450 cities with a flag? How did the flag come into existence? Who designed it and what does it mean? Come learn the story behind one of Raleigh’s most visible symbols.